NZXT Switch 810 SE Update - Inside the Case

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NZXT Switch 810 SE Update
Closer Look
Inside the Case
 

Inside the Case:

As we move to the inside of the case, we find out where the "Switch" name comes from.  Inside are a couple of modules that can hold hard drives and other 2.5" and 3.5" devices.  These two modules can be swapped out, switched around or removed as needed.  This allows for a flexible internal layout that is conducive to liquid cooling, large graphics cards and more.

Switching Module

The upper-most module comes with a 140mm fan that cools off the drives in the module as well as brings cool air into the case to cool other components.  This fan is on a swivel system so it can be directed a bit and blow on your graphics card, RAM, or other component that requires a bit more cooling.

    

Internal Fan

Another feature that I found to be quite interesting is the hot-swap bay that is located at the bottom of the front 5.25" bays.  Once the bay cover is removed, you have access to a tray that can hold either a 2.5" drive or a 3.5" drive and be slid into the hot-swap back-plane.  I tried this out with both sizes of drives and it works very well.  The nice thing is that this bay is a bit hidden so the average person won't realize that you have a fast-removable drive in your machine.

Hot Swap Bay
Hot Swap Bay
Hot Swap Board
Hot Swap Board


The motherboard tray and internal cable management layout is actually quite impressive.  There are a lot of grommeted areas for routing cables through the tray and the CPU back-plate cutout is rather large and is welcome for installing large heat-sinks and liquid cooling systems - without removing your motherboard.  This worked extremely well when we installed a Thermaltake Water 2.0 Pro kit in this case.  Cable management is great - on any of the NZXT Switch 810 versions - standard or Special Edition.

Tray - Empty
Tray - Empty
Tray - Installed
Tray - Installed


There is a lot to like about the NZXT Switch 810 SE case - including its new color.  I happily moved my test system into this case and will probably be leaving it in here as there is a ton of room for expansion, cooling and the customization of the switching modules at the front of the case.  As you can see in the image above, even with a full ATX motherboard, graphics, drives and more in the case - it still looks quite empty.  This is not a bad thing at all.

The only downside to a case of this size and not made from Aluminum is the weight.  This is not a light case and if you frequent LAN parties, you may just want to grab something a little smaller or lighter.  That being said, the options available in this box are very decent and for the price, it's hard to pass up.

While there are a few downsides - such as flimsy power button area and weight, there are a lot of great features.  The hot-swap bay is a nice addition as is the micro-filters on the bottom fans.  I am a big fan of the rear cooling slotted holes that allow for a lot of flexibility when choosing internal and exhaust cooling.  There really isn't much not to like about the 810 SE as we pointed out in our original review.

I hope this update helped you discover a bit more about the NZXT Switch 810 SE and if you want more details, please refer to our original review.  In the meantime, I'd like thank NZXT for dropping off this gunmetal case for me to check out.  If you have any comments, questions or general feedback, please drop it in the forum at the "Comments" link below.