Tuniq Potency 750W PSU

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Product: Tuniq Potency 750W 80+ SLI Certified PSU
Provided By: Tuniq
Price:

 

Introduction:

Choosing a good PSU can be one of the hardest things when custom building a new computer.  Many companies rely on brand name alone in order to sell PSUs.  Stability under load is what is really important if you're a gamer as one of the last things you want to happen is for your system to crash when you're playing the final round for cash and prizes in a tournament.  Today we are looking at the Tuniq Potency 750W PSU and are going to see what kind of a step-up this is from the last Tuniq PSU we looked at - the Potency 550W.  Both of these PSUs are "SLI-Certified" but the Tuniq Potency 750W has a total of four +12v rails while the 550W little sister only has two +12v rails.

 

Packaging & Bundle:

The Tuniq Potency 750W PSU comes packaged in a nice box that shows a picture of the PSU in the box as well as the main specs and features of the unit.  Once again, while the PSU claims to be "SLI Certified" the sticker on the box only states that the PSU is "SLI Ready" - we'll explore that in more detail later.  Tuniq has listed the PSU specs on the back of the box and this is great for the consumer as they can see exactly what kind of output to expect on each of the +12v and +5v rails.  There should be no surprises when you get it in your system. 

 PSU Box Front
PSU Box Front
PSU Box Rear
PSU Box Rear

 

A 750W PSU is probably one of the most practical PSUs for people wanting to build a high-end system with two graphics cards.  It will have enough power to keep most systems rock stable and yet won't break the bank.  It should fit nicely for many users without being overkill.  This 750W PSU comes in a standard ATX form factor and should fit in pretty much every case available.  It comes packaged with everything you need to get going and even includes a few extras to keep this non-modular PSU tidy inside your case.  Along with the standard power cord and screws is a bit of a product manual, screws, zip ties and a Molex "Y" adapter that has male and female Molex connectors.

 In The Box
In The Box
 Included Stuff
Included Stuff

 


Tuniq Potency 750W First Look:

This PSU has a pretty standard appearance for today's PSUs.  It is cooled by a large 140mm fan that spins quite slow and is very quiet - near silent under all circumstances.  We couldn't detect any additional noise to the system when we added this PSU.  The backside has the traditional honeycomb grill over the entire unit.  There is a power switch and the standard PSU cable connection.  This PSU is auto switching and can operate between 100v and 240v so it should work in pretty much any country with 50Hz to 60Hz power.

 PSU Bundle
PSU Bundle
PSU Rear
PSU Rear


Tuniq has opted out of the modular design and has all of the cables hardwired to the PSU.  They are sleeved with nice flexible material and all of the leads are quite supple.  When bundled up for shipping the cables look quite manageable, but when they are splayed out prior to installation, you get an idea of the rat's nest that has to be managed.  This can be difficult in smaller cases and is why I love modular PSUs now more than ever.  However since Ultra Products filed lawsuits for patent infringements related to modular PSUs, companies that market modular units have to pay a royalty to Ultra so that is why we are seeing more and more non-modular units like this one from Tuniq.

Before we tear into the Tuniq Potency 750W PSU, we'll take a look at some of the features and specifications of this unit on the next page.


Features & Specifications:

As of late there have been a few companies that have branded their PSUs with "SLI Certified" logos that weren't actually certified.  We decided to see if this feature was accurate so we went over to the SLI Zone and were not able to find the Tuniq Potency 750W PSU in any list for any SLI setups.  While I don't believe that an "SLI Certified" PSU is better than one that isn't actually certified, Tuniq either needs to remove the "Certified" branding or make sure that NVIDIA puts it in their list.  The only PSU from Tuniq that we can find anywhere on the SLI Zone is the Tuniq "Miniplant" 950W PSU.

PSU Label
PSU Label

The values on the label look pretty good and Tuniq is again quite conservative with their "Total Power" rating based on the amperage available to each rail.  Simple math says that the 3.3v and 5v rails should actually be capable of 242.4W.  The combined wattage of all four +12v rails is 864W max and the -12v and +5vsb is 24.6W.  Total max output is theoretically 1131W, and the conservative 750W rating of the entire unit should be pretty accurate.  Tuniq has rated this PSU at 80 PLUS efficiency, and it should run nice and cool without any issues delivering the rated output.

 

Features:

  • High Efficiency 80 plus
  • SLI Certified
  • Active PFC
  • Advanced Off-Line Cooling (Fan will not stop working until the temp below 50˘C)
  • Silent 140mm Two-Ball Fan
  • 3-year Warranty: we will replace new one when the power supply was broken within 3-years.
  • Size : 160x150x86mm 

Fan Delay
Fan Delay

 

As mentioned above, one of the interesting features of the Tuniq Potency 750W PSU is the Fan Delay-Off Function.  The idea with this 2 minute fan delay is that the fan can cool down the hot components inside the PSU as there is often a rise in temperature immediately following a system shutdown.  This fan delay helps protect your PSU from this overheating.  In reality, I'm sure the PSU won't overheat as it should be able to provide adequate cooling with the heatsinks inside.  If not, this PSU will be one toasty monster.

 

Specifications:

PSU Specs 

Connectors:

1 * 20+4Pin Mainboard
4 * PCI Express (2 * 6Pin, 2 * 6+2Pin)
6 * 4Pin Molex
1 * 4Pin FDD
6 * SATA
1 * 8Pin EPS12V
1 * 4Pin P412V

Take a quick look at the cables below before we dive inside this PSU on the next page.

 20 + 4 Pin
20 + 4 Pin
 8 Pin + 4 Pin
8 Pin + 4 Pin
PCIe Connectors
PCIe Connectors
     
 Molex Connectors
Molex Connectors
  SATA Connectors
SATA Connectors

 



Inside the Tuniq Potency 750W:

As I grounded myself and prepared to pull the cover off of this PSU, I discovered that there weren't any "Warranty Void if Removed" stickers on the case or covering the screws.  This is the only the second PSU I've pulled apart that didn't have such a sticker - the first was the Tuniq Potency 550W.  Even though there wasn't a sticker warning about electric shock, I still made a mental note not to discharge any large capacitors with my fingers.  Once the case was opened I got a good look at the main layout of the PSU.

 Tuniq Fan
Tuniq Fan
 PSU Open
PSU Open

 

The PSU specs state the Tuniq Potency is cooled by a 14cm fan, but according to my ruler and the fan model number, it's only a 13.5cm fan.  Although I guess you're supposed to round up to the closes whole number, right?  Regardless, the fan is large enough to keep the components cool.  The heatsinks are lean, well designed and seem to take advantage of the large fan.  They cover a good percentage of the choke coils and seem to make good contact with the voltage regulators.  The components inside look pretty hefty for a 750W watt unit and our hopes are beginning to feel well-grounded.

 Cooling and Capacitors
Cooling and Capacitors
PSU Inside Profile
PSU Inside Profile
Tuniq PSU Heatsinks
Tuniq PSU Heatsinks

 

You may have noticed above that the fan has a bit of a plastic shield over about 20% of the active cooling area.  This is to provide a bit of an airflow pattern inside the PSU and to protect some of the wires for getting too close to the impeller blades.

 

Test Setup & Info:

In the past, we've prided ourselves on real-world testing.  For graphics cards, CPUs and memory, what matters is what takes place in real applications and games.  We also held that philosophy for PSU testing, but after a while, we realized that there is more to a PSU that being able to run a machine stable over a few weeks or months.  In reality, if there is a lot of ripple, this can damage sensitive traces on your $700 graphics card or $1300 CPU.  A multi-meter alone is not good enough to check PSU voltage stability.  It's for this reason that we've updated our PSU testbed, and will continue to improve the detail and quality of our PSU reviews.  That being said, we will still be testing the PSU in a system and will be including stress tests from real components in the real world.

We have purchased a Tektronix TDS2002 60MHz Dual Channel scope and it has already become invaluable around the shop here at BCCHardware headquarters.  I've used it to troubleshoot everything from PSU's to Radars, and we are using it today to check the stability of the Tuniq Potency 750W PSU on the next page.



Testing - 185W & 478W: 

We initially plugged the PSU into an EZ PSU Tester 3 in order to power it on for our "idle" measurements.  As noticed below, the voltage rails were fairly stable with no load, but these aren't necessarily indicative of overall load performance.  According to our Kill-a-Watt, the power draw was 7W.  We thought these results would be interesting to include and compare with other power supplies to see how they manage a non-load situation, and how much power the PSU itself will draw.  

Just before we jump into testing it would be helpful to know what each of the +12v rails do.  As near as we can tell, one +12v rail handles the 24-pin connector, another handles the 4-pin/8-pin, Molex and SATA connections, while the other two +12v rails are assigned to each of the PCIe leads.  While we don't have any documentation to back this up, we noticed that these four groups followed the same ripple, noise and average voltage readings.


 Loaded
Loaded

This test system has undergone an upgrade for this PSU test and we wondered at first if we could push the PSU with a Core i7 920 overclocked to 4.2GHz along with a couple of Radeon 4850 graphics cards in Crossfire.  Initially, we could exceed much more than 600W, but then we found out that Furmark can really make the system scream for mercy and we managed to combine this with PMCore running a 100,000 test on all eight threads.  This brought power consumption up to 736+ Watts and we even managed to see 760W peak draw at one point.  I think it's safe to say that this PSU is being pushed pretty hard.

 12v4 Load 3v Load
3v Load

 

All of the rails managed to stay above their rated level and the lowest +12v rail dipped to a mere 12.3 even with a 736W load. The 3.3v line dropped to 3.36v, while the 5v line stayed rock solid and never fluctuated more than 0.01v.  Click the chart below for full details.

Ave Voltage

While the +12v rails looks high at 12.4v, keep in mind that they are only about 3% high and are well within specifications.  From top to bottom the voltage on any of the 12v rails never moves more than 0.1v - less that 1%.  It's a very solid showing at our tested loads.  The 5v and 3.3v lines are equally solid and never fluctuate more than 1%.  The voltages on all of the rails are a little high, but remains rock solid.  What may be a bit concerning is the fluctuation of the -12v rail.  It goes from a nice manageable -12.2 at idle to -13.2 at 736W load.  This is on the edge of the 10% tolerance.

Tuniq doesn't provide any additional information as to the ripple and noise specifications on this PSU so we assume they plan to follow standard ATX specs.  Standard ATX specifications state that the 12v lines must not exceed 120mv while the 3.3v and 5v lines must not exceed 50mv.  With that in mind let's take a look at the noise and ripple measurement.

  Ripple & Noise

Three of the 12v rails stay within ATX spec according to our strict testing methods, although the +12v4 line hits 126mV average noise at a 736W load.  This is powering one of our HD4850 cards but has remained "noisier" all through the tests.  The 3.3v, 5v and -12v lines stay with specification in terms of ripple and noise although the -12v line shows a lot of noise all through the tests.  The 3.3v and 5v lines on this PSU show some of the best performance of any PSU we've tested before - and that's something we didn't expect from Tuniq.  This 750W PSU really seems like it is up to the task - except for that darn 12v4 line...


Conclusion:

The Tuniq Potency 750W PSU is a nice step up from the first Tuniq Potency (550W) unit we looked at a few months ago.  It pleasantly surprised us with its ability to pump out the wattage and keep our test system running solid at 736W.  While it's not for extreme systems, it can certainly power many decent gaming rigs without breaking a sweat.  Its four 12v rails provide adequate power, and although the 12v4 rail appears a little noisy under a full load, it didn't affect system stability.  What irritates me though is that once again Tuniq claims the PSU is SLI Certified on their website, says SLI Ready on the box, and no SLI information is available at the SLIZone.  I would love it if Tuniq would clear up the confusion and either quit stating SLI Certified or make sure they get listed at the SLI Zone.  

Pros:

  • Standard ATX Form Factor
  • Very Quiet PSU
  • 2x 6-pin and 2x 6-pin/8-pin PCIe connectors
  • Provides ample power for most gaming system
  • Fan stays powered on 2 minutes after system shutdown to cool hot PSU components

 

Cons:

  • 12v4 rail runs a little wild on the noise/ripple test
  • -12v rail gets "wide" at -13.2v at high load
  • Not sure if it's SLI Certified or if Tuniq has just added a sticker to the box for fun.

 

BCCRating

Tuniq has once again delivered a great value PSU as this unit can be found for under $120 online.  For that price, it's certainly a good value and provides enough power for many systems.  At 750W, it's going to do a good job in many PCs without breaking the bank.

I'd like to thank Tuniq for sending this unit our way for the review.  If you have any questions, comments or general feedback, please feel free to post it in the forum at the "Comments" link below.