Tuniq Ripper 1000W Power Supply

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Product: Tuniq Ripper 1000W Power Supply
Provided By: Tuniq
Price: Find Lowest Price Online

 

Introduction:

We've looked at a few Tuniq PSUs over the past year or so and today we have their second largest unit from on our bench.  We've got the 1000W Ripper PSU plugged into our system and will take a look and see if it has enough power to keep a high-end system up and running.  This unit is a bit of a departure from the Potency PSUs we've reviewed from Tuniq in the past and will be interesting to see if the Ripper can provide clean, stable power for our system.  This PSU has four +12v rails and a total of six PCIe connectors to keep a triple SLI or CrossfireX system up and running smoothly.  There should be plenty of power left over to run the CPU and the rest of the system in most cases.  Keep on reading as we drop this unit in a system and use our digital scope to see if this PSU delivers stable power.

 Front Of Box
Front Of Box
Back Of Box
Back Of Box

 

First Impressions:

The PSU comes in a very nice retail package and proudly boasts a 3 year warranty among other features.  This PSU features 80%+ "Bronze" Power Efficiency rating - meaning that if you're drawing 1000W from the wall, the PSU is actually only providing a little better that 800W to your system.  This is something to keep in mind if you're using a Watt Meter on the input side of things.  Following the Tuniq tradition the PSU features a 14cm ball-bearing fan that operates at near silent levels.  It's also interesting to see that the fan keeps on working after the system has been powered down to keep cooling components until they are actually properly cooled down.

In The Box
In The Box
Accessories
Accessories

 

While a 750W PSU is probably one of the most practical PSUs for people wanting to build a high-end system with two graphics cards.  Those wanting to run a faster processor, overclock more and have three graphics cards in their system should look at a 1000W unit at the very least.  This PSU still retains a very standard size and should fit nicely for many users in many of their cases.  It comes packaged with everything you need to get going and even includes a few extras to keep this non-modular PSU tidy inside your case.  Along with the standard power cord and screws is a bit of a product manual, screws, zip ties two Molex "Y" adapters and a couple of Molex-to-SATA cables as well. 

 

Tuniq Ripper 1000W First Look:

This PSU has a pretty standard appearance for today's PSUs.  It is cooled by a large 140mm fan that spins quite slow and is very quiet - near silent under all circumstances.  We couldn't detect any additional noise to the system when we added this PSU.  The backside has the traditional honeycomb grill over the entire unit.  There is a power switch and the standard PSU cable connection.  This PSU is auto switching and can operate between 100v and 240v so it should work in pretty much any country with 50Hz to 60Hz power.

PSU Profile
PSU Profile
 Rear Grill
Rear Grill

 

Tuniq has opted out of the modular design and has all of the cables hardwired to the PSU.  This saves then $5/unit royalty to Ultra Products and they apparently pass the savings on to the consumer.  The cables are sleeved with nice flexible material and all of the leads are quite supple.  When bundled up for shipping the cables look quite manageable, but when they are splayed out prior to installation, you get an idea of the rat's nest that has to be managed.  This can be difficult in smaller cases and is why I love modular PSUs now more than ever.

Before we open up the Tuniq Ripper 1000W PSU, we'll take a look at some of the features and specifications of this unit on the next page.

 

Features & Specifications:

As of late there have been a few companies that have branded their PSUs with "SLI Certified" logos that weren't actually certified.  We decided to see if this feature was accurate so we went over to the SLI Zone and were not able to find the Tuniq Ripper 1000W PSU in any list for any SLI setups.  I've questioned Tuniq regarding this before and they state that NVIDIA is slow to update their list.  That being said, the Tuniq Ripper 1000W PSU doesn't officially claim to be "SLI Certified" - at least not on the box and while I'm sure it will indeed run three graphics cards as stated, those who live by "Certified" products may want to wait until it shows up in the list - or look at the 950W Miniplant.

PSU Label
PSU Label

 

The values on the label look pretty good and Tuniq appears to be quite conservative with their "Total Power" rating based on the amperage available to each rail.  Simple math says that the 3.3v and 5v rails should actually be capable of 242.4W.  The combined wattage of all four +12v rails is 1200W max and the -12v and +5vsb is 24.6W.  Total max output is theoretically 1467W, and the conservative 1000W rating of the entire unit should be pretty accurate.  Tuniq has rated this PSU at 80 PLUS efficiency, and it should run nice and cool without any issues delivering the rated output.


Features:

  • 80 PLUS Bronze Certified
  • SLI Certified
  • Support three way SLI
  • Active PFC
  • Advanced Off-Line Cooling (Allow Power Supply fan continue cooling for 120 seconds after shutdown. Provide advanced cooling and extend Power Supply, hardware/component lifetime.)
  • Full Circuit Protection (OCP/UVP/OVP/SCP/OLP)
  • Silent 140mm Two-Ball Fan
  • 3-year Warranty
  • Size : 160x150x86mm

 

As mentioned above, one of the interesting features of the Tuniq Ripper 1kW PSU is the Fan Delay-Off Function.  The idea with this 2 minute fan delay is that the fan can cool down the hot components inside the PSU as there is often a rise in temperature immediately following a system shutdown.  This fan delay helps protect your PSU from this overheating.  In reality, I don't think this is really a necessary feature, but I know of some extreme overclockers who swear by this principle.

SPECIFICATIONS

Product Number

PSU-RIP1000-BK

Power

1000W

Dimension

160mm(L) x 150mm(W) x 86mm(H)

Switches

ATX Logic on-off additional power rocker switch

Power Factor

PF > 0.95

Cooling System

140mm Fan, 1900RPM±10%

Noise

27 dBA at 1300RPM

Efficiency

Up to 80%

Hold-up Time

16 ms

INPUT

Input Voltage

100-240VAC

Input Frequency Range

47~63Hz

MTBF

100,000 hrs minimum (at 25℃)

Input Current

100Vac/13A max

OUTPUT

 

Max/Min

Regulation *1

Ripple & Noise *2

Output

+5V

30A/0.2A

±5%

70mV/100mV

180W

+3.3V

28A/0.1A

±5%

70mV/100mV

+12V1

20A/0.1A

±5%

120mV/200mV

900W

+12V2

20A/0.5A

±5%

120mV/200mV

+12V3

30A/0A

±5%

120mV/200mV

+12V4

30A/0A

±5%

120mV/200mV

-12V

0.8A/0A

±10%

150mV/200mV

9.6W

+5Vsb

3.0A/0.1A

±5%

70mV/100mV

15W

Total Power

1000W

+5Vsb' operate at 3.0A max load base on PS-ON mode.
If PS-OFF +5Vsb only operate at 3A max load.
Add 0.1µF capacitors across output terminal during ripple & noise test.

Fat Bunch Of Cables
Fat Bunch Of Cables 

 

 

Connectors:

1 * 20+4Pin Mainboard
6 * PCI Express (3 * 6Pin, 3 * 6+2Pin)
6 * 4Pin Molex
1 * 4Pin FDD
6 * SATA
1 * 8Pin EPS12V
1 * 4Pin P412V

 

Take a quick look at the cables below before we dive inside this PSU on the next page. 

24-Pin Cable
24-Pin Cable
 Molex Connectors
Molex Cables
   
SATA Cables
SATA Cables
 PCIe Cables
PCIe Cables

 

Inside the Tuniq Ripper 1000W:

As I grounded myself and prepared to pull the cover off of this PSU, I discovered that there weren't any "Warranty Void if Removed" stickers on the case or covering the screws.  This is the now the third PSU I've pulled apart that didn't have such a sticker - the previous two were also Tuniq PSUs.  Even though there wasn't a sticker warning about electric shock, I still made a mental note not to discharge any large capacitors with my fingers.  Once the case was opened I got a good look at the main layout of the PSU.

 Opened Up Profile
Opened Up Profile
 Tuniq Fan
Tuniq Fan

 

The PSU specs state the Ripper is cooled by a 14cm fan, but according to my ruler and the fan model number, it's only a 13.5cm fan - the same fan that is in the Tuniq Potency 750W unit.  Once again, we'll round up to the closest whole number and give them the missing 5mm.  Regardless, the fan is large enough to keep the components cool.  The heatsinks are lean - virtually identical to the 750W unit, but seem to be well designed and take advantage of the large fan.  They cover a good percentage of the choke coils and seem to make good contact with the voltage regulators.  The components inside look a bit lean for a 1kW watt unit and it will be interesting to see how it holds up in a few minutes.

 Inside The Ripper
Inside The Ripper
PCB & Wire Loom
PCB & Wire Loom
 Heatsinks & Capacitors
Heatsinks & Capacitors

 

You may have noticed above that the fan has a bit of a plastic shield over about 20% of the active cooling area.  This is to provide a bit of an airflow pattern inside the PSU and to protect some of the wires for getting too close to the impeller blades.  You may also notice that this PSU is almost identical internally to the 750W Tuniq Potency we reviewed a while ago over here.

 

Test Setup & Info:

In the past, we've prided ourselves on real-world testing.  For graphics cards, CPUs and memory, what matters is what takes place in real applications and games.  We also held that philosophy for PSU testing, but after a while, we realized that there is more to a PSU that being able to run a machine stable over a few weeks or months.  In reality, if there is a lot of ripple, this can damage sensitive traces on your $700 graphics card or $1300 CPU.  A multi-meter alone is not good enough to check PSU voltage stability.  It's for this reason that we've updated our PSU testbed, and will continue to improve the detail and quality of our PSU reviews.  That being said, we will still be testing the PSU in a system and will be including stress tests from real components in the real world.

We have purchased a Tektronix TDS2002 60MHz Dual Channel scope and it has already become invaluable around the shop here at BCCHardware headquarters.  I've used it to troubleshoot everything from PSU's to Radars, and we are using it today to check the stability of the Tuniq Ripper 1000W PSU on the next page.


Testing - 237W & 780W: 

We initially plugged the PSU into an EZ PSU Tester 3 in order to power it on for our "idle" measurements.  As noticed below, the voltage rails were fairly stable with no load, but these aren't necessarily indicative of overall load performance.  According to our Kill-a-Watt, the power draw was 9W with a PFC rating of 0.54.  We thought these results would be interesting to include and compare with other power supplies to see how they manage a non-load situation, and how much power the PSU itself will draw.  

Just before we jump into testing it would be helpful to know what each of the +12v rails do.  As near as we can tell, one +12v rail handles the 24-pin connector, another handles the 4-pin/8-pin, Molex and SATA connections, while the other two +12v rails are assigned to each of the PCIe leads.  While we don't have any documentation to back this up, we noticed that these four groups followed the same ripple, noise and average voltage readings.


This test system has undergone an upgrade for this PSU test and we wondered at first if we could push the PSU with a Core i7 920 overclocked to 4.2GHz along with a couple of Radeon 4870 graphics cards in Crossfire.  Initially, we could exceed much more than 600W, but then we found out that Furmark can really make the system scream for mercy and we managed to combine this with Prime95 running a torture test on all eight threads.  This brought power consumption up to 780+ Watts and we even managed to see 812W peak draw at one point.  In addition to the main hardware, the system was cooled down with a modded CoolIT Freezone Elite.  I think it's safe to say that this PSU is being pushed pretty hard.

 12v 1
12v 1
12v 2
12v 2
   
 3.3v
3.3v
5v
5v

 

All of the rails managed to stay above their rated level and the lowest +12v rail dipped to a mere 12.3 even with a 780W load. The 3.3v line dropped a whole 0.01v to 3.4v, while the 5v line stayed rock solid and never fluctuated more than 0.04v.  Click the chart below for full details.

Average Voltage

 

While the +12v rails looks high at 12.4v - 12.5v, keep in mind that they are only about 3%-4% high and are well within standard ATX specifications.  From top to bottom the voltage on any of the 12v rails never moves more than 0.1v - less that 1%.  It's a very solid showing at our tested loads.  The 5v and 3.3v lines are equally solid and never fluctuate more than 1%.  The voltages on all of the rails are a little high, but remains rock solid.

As far as ripple and noise go, this is where things get interesting.  Standard ATX specifications show that the 3.3v and 5v lines are not to exceed 50mV ripple while the 12v lines are not to vary more than 120mV.  These are pretty standard - and most PSUs adhere to these very well.  Tuniq on the other hand is much more liberal with their tolerance.  They allow 70mV to 100mV on the 3.3v and 5v lines and 120mV to 200mV ripple on the 12v lines with the -12v line acceptable in the 150mV to 200mV range.  While I'm sure that no damage will occur to your system in these ranges, it seems to me that Tuniq doesn't think their PSU can live up to the ATX specifications so they've slackened off their own specifications.

 Ave Ripple

 

All of the rails stayed within standard ATX specifications and well below the more liberal Tuniq specifications.  Although this PSU does generate a fair bit of electrical noise, it doesn't break any rules and stays within specifications at all times.  The 3.3v and 5v lines on this PSU are very stable and these are the lines that often test out of range.  The 1000W Ripper PSU looks very much like the smaller 750W Potency, but there has obviously been some interior work on this unit and it really seems like it is up to the task - and an improvement over the 750W little sister.

 

Conclusion:

The Tuniq Ripper 1000W PSU is a nice step up from the mid-range PSU lineup.  It pleasantly surprised us with its ability to pump out the wattage and keep our test system running solid at 780W+.  It borders on the extreme, but because of the looser ripple and noise tolerances, I'd be hesitant to rely on this unit in a highly overclocked Core i7 system with three GTX 285 or three HD4890 cards.  While it's not for the most extreme systems, it can certainly power many hardcore computers without breaking a sweat.  Its four 12v rails provide adequate power and are actually rated at a maximum load of 1200W (if you do the math).  What irritates me though is that once again Tuniq claims the PSU is SLI Certified on their website, says SLI Ready on the box, and no SLI information is available at the SLIZone.  I would love it if Tuniq would clear up the confusion and either quit stating SLI Certified or make sure they get listed at the SLI Zone.  

 

Pros:

  • Standard ATX Form Factor
  • Very Quiet PSU
  • 3x 6-pin and 3x 6-pin/8-pin PCIe connectors
  • Provides ample power for all but the most extreme systems
  • Fan stays powered on 2 minutes after system shutdown to cool hot PSU components

 

Cons:

  • Not sure if it's SLI Certified or if Tuniq has just added a sticker to the box for fun.
  • I'd love to see a modular unit - cables are long and add lots of clutter.

 

  BCCRating

Tuniq has once again delivered a great value PSU as this unit can be found for under $160 online.  For that price, it's certainly a great value for a 1000W unit and provides enough power for almost every system.  At 1kW, it's going to do a good job in many PCs without breaking the bank.

I'd like to thank Tuniq for sending this unit our way for the review.  If you have any questions, comments or general feedback, please feel free to post it in the forum at the "Comments" link below.