Samsung S27C750P 27-inch LED Monitor - Test Setup and Testing

Article Index
Samsung S27C750P 27-inch LED Monitor
S27C750P Features and Specifications
Test Setup and Testing
Subjective Tests and Conclusion

A Word about Testing:

In everything we try to be fair, accurate and as objective as possible when it comes to testing hardware. In the past, LCD reviews were done completely subjectively, but we have purchased some equipment that takes some of this out of the equation. Take a look at our LCD Testing methodology over here to get a better idea of how we test LCDs.

We won't spend much time in the menu; it is pretty standard although a little stripped down in terms of contrast, color adjustments and the like. The only real setting in the menu that will help you tweak your screen is the "Brightness" and "Contrast" control. We've also recently updated our Datacolor Spyder software and this gives us even more options for precision testing.

 

Color Accuracy:

We started this off once again by breaking out the LCD Spyder and finding out how well this unit comes setup from factory and how well it produces accurate color. We did this using an HDMI connection and reset the monitor to defaults before we started.

Uncalibrated

Uncalibrated

Uncalibrated + Target

Uncalibrated + Target

Adjustment Curves

Adjustment Curves

 

As you can see in the images above, the color accuracy was pretty close to being perfect. The image that shows "Uncalibrated + Target" shows there is not really much difference between the two. A slight adjustment was needed to make it line up with completely accurate color. As is the case with most displays, the calibrated settings look "warmer" and the skin tones are balanced much better than what comes factory default.

 

Contrast Ratio & Uniformity:

With the display now displaying "perfect" color and brightness, we continue on to take our contrast readings. We used our luminance meter for our traditional contrast readings as indicated below.

 Black Spot
White Spot
Contrast Ratio
0.25 249.2 996.8:1

I realize that the maximum luminance could have been a lot higher, but when we test LCDs we make sure that they are calibrated properly and then give you the results that you will see when using them - not the maximum "theoretical" numbers.  After we finished with our luminance meter, we also used the Datacolor Spyder with the latest software update to perform contrast readings as various brightness levels.

Contrast Ratio Brightness Chart

Contrast Ratio at Different Brightness Settings

 

We used the updated Spyder software to get a lighting uniformity reading at different brightness levels. The software and hardware combination takes readings at different brightness levels at different places on the screen to blend together results. It's interesting to see how different brightness levels on the monitor yield much different uniformity results. Please note the uniformity and brightness levels below.

Uniformity at 50%
Uniformity at 50%

Uniformity at 67%
Uniformity at 67%

   

Uniformity at 83%
Uniformity at 83%

Uniformity at 100%
Uniformity at 100%

 

As you can see the backlight drops off in certain areas of the display, but never drops below 81% of the brightest point.  While that may sound like a lot, often other "premium" displays from other companies can vary as much as 20%.  The Samsung S27C750P comes in with a maximum 19% variation and is at the limit of what I'd like to think is acceptable. That being said, you don't notice that much difference with your eyes. While some edges do seem to not be as bright, it's not widely noticeable. Still, it measures 19%.

On the last page we'll cover some real-world applications and see how it holds up playing movies as well as day-to-day tasks before we wrap things up.